Tips for Windows 95 from Tipworld

 

I got the tips to begin these pages over a period of a couple of months, I personally got some benefit out of this and  I hope you will also.

To the Contents Page
Back to the Windows 95 Help page
Back to the Utility Page


 


RESTRICTED ACCESS, PART 3 of 5

In our last tip, we introduced the System Policy Editor, which allows you to set up restrictions on your computer. To access this tool, navigate your way to ADMIN\APPTOOLS\POLEDIT (on the Windows 95 installation CD) and double-click POLEDIT.EXE. Select Open Registry under the File menu, then double-click the Local User icon. To restrict the programs to which people have access from the start menu, use the Policy Editor to replace the Programs folder. First, create a new folder that includes the items you'd like in the Programs folder. Inside the Policy Editor, double-click Shell and then Custom Folders. Select Custom Programs Folder, and at the bottom of the dialog box, type the path of the folder you just created. Finally, select "Hide Start Menu subfolders." Click OK, and as always, save your changes by selecting Save under the Policy Editor's File menu. Restart Windows 95, select Programs under Start, and you'll find only those items you placed in the new Programs folder.(To undo this setting, deselect it and save your change.)


RESTRICTED ACCESS, PART 4 of 5

In a previous tip, we introduced the System Policy Editor, which allows you to set up restrictions on your computer. To access this tool, navigate your way to ADMIN\APPTOOLS\POLEDIT (on the Windows 95 installation CD) and double-click POLEDIT.EXE. Select Open Registry under the File menu, then double-click the Local User icon.

If you don't want anyone messing with your Registry, disable the Registry editing tools. Inside the Policy Editor, double-click the System book, then Restrictions. Select Disable Registry editing tools, click OK, then select Save under File.(To undo this restriction, deselect it and save your change.)
 



 
RESTRICTED ACCESS, PART 5 of 5

In a previous tip, we introduced the System Policy Editor, which allows you to set up restrictions on your computer. To access this tool, navigate your way to ADMIN\APPTOOLS\POLEDIT (on the Windows 95 installation CD) and double-click POLEDIT.EXE. Select Open Registry under the File menu, then double-click the Local User icon.

Let's say you're going on vacation and want the temp using your computer to have access to only specific applications. Inside the Policy Editor, double-click the System book, then double-click Restrictions and select Only Run Allowed Windows Applications. Click on Show, then select Add and type the executable file name (not the entire path) of the application you'd like to allow. An example is POLEDIT.EXE. Click on OK, and repeat these steps until all allowed applications are on the list. Click on OK again, then select Save under the Policy Editor's File menu to save your changes.(To undo this restriction, deselect it and save your change.)


HAPPY TRAILS

If you have a hard time following your mouse pointer across the screen, ask Windows 95 to trail it. The pointer trails option displays a number of pointers along the pointer's path, making it easier to track visually.Open the Control Panel and double-click on Mouse. Next, click on the Motion tab and select Show Pointer Trails. Finally, move the lever toward Long or Short, depending on the length of the trail you want, and click on OK. Try moving that pointer around and your mouse now has a tail!


HOVER-CRAFTINESS

Are you addicted to the Hover game included on the Windows 95 installation CD? Then add it to your hard drive, so you won't have to fumble with that disk. Surely, you have an extra 1.87MB of space to spare.The Add/Remove Programs option doesn't provide you with a check box for installing Hover, but that doesn't mean it can't be done. To install this game on your system, with the CD in your CD-ROM drive, open Windows Explorer. Navigate your way to X:\FUNSTUFF, where X is your CD-ROM drive, and you'll see a Hover folder. Copy this folder to your hard drive.

To start the game, double-click on HOVER.EXE. For even easier access, place a shortcut to this file on your desktop, or in your personal Games folder. You do have a Games folder, no?


A PRINTS-LY DESKTOP

Want to print directly from your desktop? Then place a printer shortcut there. Double-click on My Computer, double-click on the Printers folder, and then right-mouse click and drag your printer icon onto the desktop. Let go, select Create Shortcut(s) Here, and voila.When you want to print a file, just drag its icon onto the printer shortcut and let go. You don't even have to open the application in which the file was created (Windows 95 does that for you).


LET 'EM RIP

Do you have sections of text or particular graphics that you plan to use in more than one place? As long as they were created in a Windows 95-savvy application (such as Microsoft Word 97 and beyond), you can turn them into document scraps--pieces of documents that can be used again and again. You can store these scraps anywhere you want (how about in a folder called Scraps?). Creating a scrap is similar to creating a shortcut. Highlight the text or graphics you want to keep around, then drag it into your Scraps folder, or onto the desktop, or anywhere else you'd like to store it. Let go, and a shortcut with the word "Scrap" in it should appear. (If not, that application may not be as savvy as you think.) To use a scrap, just drag and drop it onto a document.


WHAT COLOR IS YOUR BRIEFCASE? PART 1 OF 3

Have you ever worked on a file on more than one computer--for example, your work PC and a laptop--and wished that you could keep both copies current? With the Windows 95 Briefcase by your side, you'll never waste time trying to figure out which copy is the most recent again. It keeps both copies current and up to date. Right-mouse click on the desktop, select New, and then select Briefcase. (If there's no Briefcase item in the menu, you'll need to go back and install this component using the installation disk. In the Control Panel, click on Add/Remove Programs, and on the Windows Setup tab, double-click on Accessories. Select Briefcase, click on OK, and so on.) Copy any files you'll be editing away from your computer into the new Briefcase, and stay tuned. In our next two tips, we'll explain how to use the Briefcase on a laptop or another desktop computer.


WHAT COLOR IS YOUR BRIEFCASE? PART 2 OF 3

In our last tip, we introduced the Windows 95 Briefcase, a tool that allows you to edit files away from their originating computer while keeping both the original and the copy current. To set up a Briefcase, right-mouse click on the desktop, select New, and then select Briefcase. Add to this folder copies of any files you plan to modify away from that computer. If you want to work on the Briefcase files on a laptop, connect the laptop to this system over your office network or via direct cable connection, then move the Briefcase from your office computer's desktop to your laptop's desktop. Now go to work. Make all the changes you want to those files; just don't move them out of the Briefcase, or you'll lose the link to the original. Once you move the Briefcase back to the original system, you'll want to update the original files so they match those in the Briefcase (the same applies if you've edited the originals and want them to match those in the Briefcase). To update, select Update All under the Briefcase menu. Briefcase will now present you with the Update dialog box, which itemizes the updating it's about to do. Click on Update to proceed, and all of your files are now up to date.


WHAT COLOR IS YOUR BRIEFCASE? PART 3 OF 3

In a previous tip, we introduced the Windows 95 Briefcase, a tool that allows you to edit files away from their originating computer while keeping both the original and the copy current. To set up a Briefcase, right-mouse click on the desktop, select New, and then select Briefcase. Add to this folder copies of any files you plan to modify away from that computer. If you'll be working on the Briefcase files on another system, such as your home PC, and you'll be transporting them via floppy disk, right-mouse click on the Briefcase, select Send To, and then select your floppy drive (with floppy disk inserted, of course). When you arrive at the second computer, copy the Briefcase's files to that system's hard drive. (Just be sure the Briefcase remains on the floppy disk.) Now the copies on the second computer, those on the Briefcase, and the originals are all linked. After editing the copies on the second computer, use Briefcase's update function once to transfer these changes to the files on the Briefcase, and then again to transfer them to the originals. On the second system (where you just edited the files), open the Briefcase and select Update All under the Briefcase menu. In the Update dialog box, click on Update. The first update is complete. Now take the floppy disk containing the Briefcase (which now includes all of your changes) back to the original computer and follow these same steps to transfer the changes to the originals. (Note: If you revised the originals instead, and wanted to update the copies on the second system, simply reverse the updating procedure--from originals to the Briefcase, then from the Briefcase to the copies.)


STARTUP-LESS STARTUP

When Windows 95 loads, it loads every application whose shortcut you've placed in the StartUp folder (in your Start menu under Programs). Occasionally, however, you may not want these applications to load, although you don't want to go so far as to remove them from the StartUp folder. In that case, tell Windows 95 to avoid loading them during that startup only. When you see the Windows 95 logo on-screen, hold down Shift until the operating system finishes loading, and then let go. Those StartUp applications are nowhere to be found!


ONE LESS DOUBLE-CLICK

If you use floppy disks a lot, you may be getting good and tired of opening My Computer or Explorer to get to the floppy drive icon so that you can work with its contents. Make your life easier by placing a shortcut to this drive on the desktop. Right-mouse click and drag your floppy drive icon from My Computer or Explorer onto the desktop, let go, and select Create Shortcut(s) Here. Do you know how many double-clicks you've just saved yourself?


     Page 5
To the Next Page
To the Top


This page is designed and written by John Jenkins. If there are any questions or other issues about the content, email me, and I will deal with it in a timely manner. If specific help is requested an email address with an lctn.com or ecsis.net domain is required. As with all programs on the internet, you, the downloader, assumes all risk of file damage or viruses that these or any programs may contain that are received over the internet. Neither CSS, ECS, nor the author will be responsible for any damage done by any program received over the internet. Please note this includes programs that are virus free but may cause problems with other programs on your computer and programs that simply won't run right on a particular machine.